Founders and Directors-ISR Executive Education - Carnegie Mellon University

Dr. Raj Reddy

Dr. Raj Reddy

Mozah Bint Nasser University Professor of Computer Science and Robotics, Founder of the Institute for Software Research

The Institute for Software Research was founded in 1999 by Professor Raj Reddy, after serving as Dean of the School of Computer Science, 1991-99, and as founding Director of the Robotics Institute, 1979-91.

Dr. Reddy's accomplishments are legendary. He is a member of the National Academy of Engineering and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. He was president of the American Association for Artificial Intelligence, 1987-89. He was awarded the Legion of Honor by French President Mitterand in 1984, the Bronze Tower by Korean President Kim Dae-jung in 2002, the ACM Turing Award in 1994, the Okawa Prize in 2004, the Honda Prize in 2005, and the Vannevar Bush Award in 2006. He served as co-chair of the President's Information Technology Advisory Committee under U.S. Presidents Clinton and Bush, 1999-2001.

In ISR, Reddy has led efforts in Carnegie Mellon's Million Book Universal Digital Library projects with India, China, and other countries, and helped establish Carnegie Mellon campuses in Silicon Valley and in Qatar.


Dr. William L. Scherlis

Dr. William L. Scherlis

Director of Institute for Software Research, Founding Director of PhD in Software Engineering, Professor of School of Computer Science

William L. Scherlis is a full Professor in the School of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon. He is the founding director of CMU's PhD Program in Software Engineering and director of CMU's Institute for Software Research (ISR) in the School of Computer Science. His research relates to software assurance, software evolution, and technology to support software teams. Dr. Scherlis joined the CMU faculty after completing a PhD in Computer Science at Stanford University, a year at the University of Edinburgh (Scotland) as a John Knox Fellow, and an A.B. at Harvard University.

He was lead Principal Investigator of the High Dependability Computing Project (HDCP), in which CMU led a collaboration with five universities to help NASA address long-term software dependability challenges. He was also co-Principal Investigator (with two colleagues) of a project with NASA and diverse industry and laboratory subcontractors focused on dependable real-time and embedded software systems. The project he led on software assurance technology and practices led to the creation of SureLogic, a Carnegie Mellon spinoff.

Scherlis is involved in a number of activities related to technology and policy, recently testifying before Congress on innovation and information technology, and, previously, on roles for a Federal CIO. He interrupted his career at CMU to serve at DARPA for six years, departing in 1993 as senior executive responsible for coordination of software research. While at DARPA he had responsibility for research and strategy in computer security, aspects of high performance computing, information infrastructure, and other topics.

Scherlis chairs the National Research Council (NRC) study committee on defense software producibility and is a member of the NRC study committee on cybersecurity. He served multiple terms as a member of the DARPA Information Science and Technology Study Group (ISAT). He recently completed chairing a NRC study on information technology, innovation, and e-government. He has led or participated in other national studies related to cybersecurity, crisis response, analyst information management, Department of Defense software management, and health care informatics infrastructure. He has been an advisor to major IT companies. He has served as program chair for a number of technical conferences, including the ACM Foundations of Software Engineering (FSE) Symposium. He has more than 70 scientific publications.


John Kang

John Kang

Director of Asia Collaboration

Since 2002, John Kang has led ISR's Executive and Professional Education Office to expand the University's international impact through academic programs, executive education and training and corporate relationships. He has been successful in his efforts through building on Carnegie Mellon's existing strengths under the University's Strategic Plan.

Kang has been responsible in the development of collaborative relationships with South Korea, China, Singapore, Vietnam, and other Asian countries. Through building relationships with central and local governments, national research institutes, academia and industry leaders, Kang has led joint efforts in R&D, education and training, national human resource development policy and management.